My new Reference—The Bergmann Audio Magne Turntable

My new Reference—The Bergmann Audio Magne Turntable

2019 has been a banner year for both Audiophilia and the improvement of my reference system. Audiophilia has added two fine writers and experienced significant growth in worldwide readership and advertising sponsors. I feel we have accomplished this through timely updates and excellence and honesty in audio reportage. There are no shortcuts at the magazine. And through the generosity and kindness of some audio legacy stakeholders we have known and highly respected for a long time, a couple of us here at the magazine have received a few long-term loan components to enhance our daily listening experience. For that, we are transparently grateful.

Reading previous reviews and articles will give you a better insight as to the whys and wherefores of our choices of these wonderful components. Try my 2014 review of the Bergmann Audio Magne Turntable ($14,000 incl. tone arm) and review of Alta Audio’s FRM2 Celesta Loudspeakers ($15,000). A look at Contributing Editor Karl Sigman’s latest VPI and Grado reviews will also offer context.

Tchaikovsky: Symphonies 4,5 & 6/Wiener Philharmoniker Conducted by Herbert von Karajan/Esoteric reissue

Tchaikovsky: Symphonies 4,5 & 6/Wiener Philharmoniker Conducted by Herbert von Karajan/Esoteric reissue

Symphony’s 4, 5, and 6, by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, written in Russia between 1877 and 1893, are not only the composer’s crowning achievements, but have been orchestral war horses for the last hundred years.  Almost every major conductor has recorded these works at least once. In the case of esteemed Berlin Philharmonic conductor Herbert Von Karajan, he recorded the set at least three times (possibly more with the inclusion of his mono catalogue), with many more individual recordings along the way. Two were recorded with the Berlin Philharmonic under EMI and Deutsche Grammophon in the 1960s and 70s respectively. The final set was again recorded by Deutsche Grammophon in 1985, this time with the Vienna Philharmonic, another orchestra Karajan had a long and illustrious relationship with. This final set, recorded digitally just four years before the maestro’s death in 1989, was originally issued on both LP and CD, and now Japanese SACD manufacturer Esoteric have decided to revisit this recording from Karajan’s twilight years.