Weaned on CDs, They’re Reaching for Vinyl

by Audiophilia on June 11, 2013 · 1 comment

in Analogue

photo: Andrea Mohin/The New York Times. Thomas Bernich, who founded Brooklyn Phono in 2000, at his factory, which he says now produces around 440,000 LPs a year.

photo: Andrea Mohin/The New York Times. Thomas Bernich, who founded Brooklyn Phono in 2000, at his factory, which he says now produces around 440,000 LPs a year.

A little late to the vinyl resurgence party, but nice to read even the venerable New York Times are adding to the fervour.

From the New York Times:

Vinyl is growing out of its niche.

There were always record collectors who disdained the compact disc, arguing that an LP’s grooves yielded warmth and depth that the CD’s digital code could not match.

But the market largely ignored them. Record labels shuttered their LP pressing plants, except for a few that pressed mostly dance music, since vinyl remained the medium of choice for D. J.s.

As it turned out, that early resistance was not futile, thanks largely to an audience of record collectors, many born after CDs were introduced in the 1980s.

These days, every major label and many smaller ones are releasing vinyl, and most major new releases have a vinyl version, leading to a spate of new pressing plants.

Read more of Allan Kozinn’s article at the New York Times.

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

marvin fox 06.15.13 at 6:51 pm

I think vinyl is much more natural sounding and has more musicality than cd sounds period.I use to listen to cd sound not any longer.

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