Martin Appel/ My audiophile association with DEQX started in 2006 with their fist unit, the PD-2.6P. The unit’s unique hardware and software opened up a new understanding of speaker behavior and what was possible in speaker/room correction. In April 2011 I reviewed their next iteration, the HDP-3 . It was a significant improvement over the PD-2.6P and received a well deserved, positive review.

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Andy Fawcett/ I recall a friend once observing, only half jokingly, that his system was sounding so good he was afraid even to dust it, in case the magic disappeared! Suffice to say that, for the two or so years since reviewing Antipodes Audio’s entry-level Komako speaker cables, I’ve had a very dusty system. In combination with the matching interconnects, they helped me achieve a sound of such intense coherence, refinement, energy and sheer naturalness that I was completely absorbed in the pure pleasure of listening to music, and wanted for nothing more.

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Anthony Kershaw/ Oct 9, 2013. Hahn Hall, Music Academy of the West, Santa Barbara, CA– While taking a quick trip up the coast from LA to taste some superb Pinots in the Santa Barbara appellation, I was able to attend the local debut of virtuoso violinist, Ray Chen at the Music Academy of the West.

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There’s nothing better for audiophiles than quality audio shows. New kit, great sound, cool rooms, like minded people, old friends. Fantastic. The number of wonderful shows is growing. And, there’s nothing better than a great show in your hometown. TAVES is coming for the third year to the King Edward Hotel here in Toronto (Nov 1 -3).

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Roy Harris/ I noticed a thread on a popular audio forum whose subject was the High Fidelity Cables CT-1. The thread generated over 200 responses. As I read the posts, I noticed unanimous praise for the aforementioned cable products. At the time, Audiophilia had no plans for me to review another cable. However, the comments I read, piqued my interest.

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Anthony Kershaw/ I killed two Italian birds with one stone while reviewing the mighty and impressive Audia Flight Strumento n1 Stereo Pre Amplifier. To the preamp, I added the hefty and equally impressive n4 power amplifier. Both these pieces are the stars of the Audia Flight (AF) top line, named Strumento.

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by Anthony Kershaw

Los Angeles Philharmonic
Gustavo Dudamel, conductor
Yefim Bronfman, piano
Pedro Carneiro, percussion

LIEBERSON (Oliver Knussen Realization): Shing Kham (world premiere, LA Phil commission)
SCHUBERT: Symphony No. 4 “Tragic”
TCHAIKOVSKY: Piano Concerto No. 1

Oct 6, 2013. Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, CA — This was my first visit to the sexy confines of the acoustically wonderful Disney Hall. Designed by Canadian Frank Gehry, the hall was constructed with his trademark steel and titanium shell and a fir wood interior. It makes for a spectacular hall both visually and aurally.

Adding to the lustre was the excellent Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra. Always a fine group, Gustavo Dudamel’s band is a different animal than when I first heard them in London many years ago. First, he’s hired very well. Lots of musical superstars dotting the landscape. Then, there’s Dudamel. You all know the story. Enough said, that he is a wonderful conductor and musician and serves as an inspiration wherever he performs.

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by Anthony Kershaw

Can one ever get enough Brahms? Not me. Especially, his four magnificent symphonies. In my life, there’s always room for another set. Here we have half a set — I assume Symphonies Nos. 3 & 4 are in the can and on their way soon. In addition to the first two symphonies, we get the bonus of the Tragic Overture and Variations on a Theme of Haydn, both of which receive wonderful performances.

I associate the Brahms Symphonies with conductors Walter, Klemperer, Furtwängler, even von Karajan. I would not have thought mercurial (and inconsistent) Valery Gergiev a top match for the composer, especially his autumnal qualities. I was wrong!

These performances are as good as any. Gergiev digs deep into the architecture of the works allowing counterpoint, usually shrouded in ‘thick’ playing, messy acoustics or poor recordings, to the fore. It makes for interesting and instructive listening.

But, make no mistake, these are not musical dissertations on contrapuntal writing. What Gergiev and his magnificent London Symphony Orchestra give us are superbly played, exciting performances. Now and again — 2nd subject flute solo of No. 2, mvt 1 and the final bars of No. 1 — Gergiev allows a little hesitation in the service of interpretation. He’s not trying to be different, just musical. It may work for some, others not so much. Me? S’okay. But, the big picture is magnificent.

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